Workshop :Antiquitatum Thesaurus: Antiquities in European Visual Sources from the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

Antiquitatum Thesaurus: Antiquities in European Visual Sources from the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

Egypt in Early-Modern Antiquarian Imagery

Digital Workshops on 5 May, 2 June and 7 July 2022

On the occasion of this year’s anniversaries of important milestones in the recent reception of Egypt, the academy project “Antiquitatum Thesaurus” devotes three digital workshops in the summer semester of 2022 to the perception of the land on the Nile in the early-modern period. The focus will be on various personal motivations of some of the protagonists, the antiquarian or scientific methods they used, and a broad spectrum of media in which the engagement with Egyptian or Egyptianizing artifacts and images was reflected from the 15th to the 18th century. In addition, current research projects present their perspectives on the reception of Egypt.

Programme

5 May 2022 – 4 p.m.

Michail Chatzidakis (Berlin):
Ad summam sui verticem pyramidalem in figuram vidimus ascendentes […] anti quissimum Phoenicibus caracteribus epigramma conspeximus“. Bemerkungen zu den ägyptischen Reisen Ciriacos d’Ancona

Catharine Wallace (West Chester):
Pirro Ligorio and the Late Renaissance Memory of Egypt in Rome

Stefan Baumann (Trier):
Project Presentation: Early Egyptian Travel Accounts from Late Antiquity to Napoleon

Please register at: https://bit.ly/3LQWgMB

2 June 2022 – 4 p.m.

Maren Elisabeth Schwab (Kiel):
Herodots Ägypten im Interessenshorizont italienischer Antiquare

Alfred Grimm (München):
Osiris cum capite Accipitris. Zu einem Objekt aus der Bellori-Sammlung und dem Barberinischen „Osiris“

Florian Ebeling (München):
Project Presentation: Handwörterbuch zur Geschichte der Ägyptenrezeption

Please register at: https://bit.ly/3O4dS9O

7 July 2022 – 4 p.m.

Guillaume Sellier (Montréal):
Oldest Egyptian Artefacts in Canada: The Quebec Palace Intendant’s Amulets

Valentin Boyer (Paris):
„Sphinxomanie“ durch die Ikonographie ägyptisierender Exlibris

Nils Hempel, Timo Strauch (BBAW):
Project Presentation: Antiquitatum Thesaurus. Antiken in den europäischen Bildquel­len des 17. und 18. Jahrhunderts

Please register at: https://bit.ly/3rd7T8z

further information unter: https://thesaurus.bbaw.de/en

Appel à communication : Egypt in Early-Modern Antiquarian Imagery

Egyptian Sculptures, in: Michel-François Dandré-Bardon: Costume des anciens peuples, Paris 1772, part 24, pl. IV (Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte, Munich)

Egypt in Early-Modern Antiquarian Imagery

Digital Workshops on 5 May, 2 June and 7 July 2022

In 2022, Egyptology celebrates important historical events that number among the highlights in the exploration of the culture and civilization of the country by the Nile. In 1822, Jean-François Champollion succeeded in deciphering the hieroglyphics, the hieratic and the demotic scripts, by working primarily with the Rosetta Stone. In 1922, the British archaeologist Howard Carter discovered the tomb of the Pharaoh Tutankhamun in the Valley of the Kings.

The academy research project “Antiquitatum Thesaurus” would like to contribute to the international discourse and, in three half-day digital workshops in the summer semester of 2022 (5 May / 2 June / 7 July), draw attention to some central questions of the early-modern reception of Egypt, which preceded the events mentioned above.

How did contacts with the land of the pharaohs and their culture come about, and what image of it was conveyed? What role did aegyptiaca play in collections of antiquities, cabinets des curiosités or Wunderkammern? How were Egyptian or Egyptianising artefacts visually documented and discussed?

Before Napoleon’s great military expeditions and the subsequent scientific explorations of the country, when the number of travellers to the Levant was still manageable, the perception and understanding of Egypt far from the Nile had to rely primarily on easily portable objects. These had found their way to the other side of the Mediterranean at different times and along different routes. Finally, the study of ancient Greek and Roman authors, who transmitted their own mediated version of history and Egyptian culture, should not be underestimated.

Continuer la lecture de « Appel à communication : Egypt in Early-Modern Antiquarian Imagery »

Colloque : Collectionner : acteurs, lieux et valeur(s) (1750 – 1815) (26-27 octobre 2020, en ligne)

Adriaan de Lelie, De kunstgalerij van Jan Gildemeester Jansz, huile sur toile, 1794–95, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

Colloque du GRHAM et du séminaire Collection

Collectionner : acteurs, lieux et valeur(s) (1750 – 1815)

26-27 octobre 2020 – En ligne

Le Groupe de Recherche en Histoire de l’Art Moderne (GRHAM) et le Séminaire Collection s’associent pour l’organisation d’un colloque sur le thème du collectionnisme. Intitulé Collectionner : acteurs, lieux et valeur(s) (1750 – 1815), cet événement a comme objectif d’analyser les collectionneurs à travers leurs pratiques et leurs représentations, en insistant sur de nouvelles pistes de réflexions méthodologiques. Celles-ci permettront d’extraire cette thématique d’approches purement biographiques et monographiques. À partir de cas précis, le colloque entend appréhender le collectionnisme par le biais de problématiques et de méthodes propres qui vont au-delà de la reconstitution d’une collection, un travail certes incontournable, mais conçu ici plutôt comme le point de départ d’une réflexion. Bien que les thématiques à exploiter soient nombreuses, nous nous proposons de borner notre examen à l’étude de quatre axes principaux.

Continuer la lecture de « Colloque : Collectionner : acteurs, lieux et valeur(s) (1750 – 1815) (26-27 octobre 2020, en ligne) »

The Oriental Ceramic Society Online Lectures 2020 : The Reception and Consumption of Chinese Porcelain in Europe and the New World: 16th and 17th centuries (29 septembre 2020)

The Reception and Consumption of Chinese Porcelain in Europe and the New World: 16th and 17th centuries.

Intervenant : Dr Teresa Canepa

29 september 2020, 14h30 (Paris time)

A few pieces of Chinese porcelain are known to have arrived to Europe in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, along the famous overland route, the Silk Road, that traversed the heartland of the Eurasian continent or by ship through the Persian Gulf or Red Sea to Turkey, Egypt and Venice. The great maritime voyages of exploration launched by Portugal and Spain at the end of the 15th century in search of the Spice Islands, culminated in Bartolomeu Dias’s discovery of a route to the Indian Ocean round the Cape of Good Hope in 1488, and Christopher Columbus’s discovery of the New World, four years later, in 1492, which opened up direct sea trade routes between Europe, the New World, Africa and Asia via both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. By the beginning of the 17th century, trading companies from the Northern Netherlands/Dutch Republic and England began to take part in the trade to Asia via the Cape of Good Hope and partly gained control of the Asian maritime trade. This online lecture will briefly examine textual, material and visual sources that provide information on the various types of Chinese porcelain that were imported to Europe and the New World in the 16th and 17th centuries, as well as the different ways in which they were acquired, appreciated and used within the respective societies.

Continuer la lecture de « The Oriental Ceramic Society Online Lectures 2020 : The Reception and Consumption of Chinese Porcelain in Europe and the New World: 16th and 17th centuries (29 septembre 2020) »